‘Play’ May Be More Stressful for Kids With Autism

Four young children playing soccer.Children with autism appear to approach play differently than typically developing children, a recent study contends.

“Children with autism lack a social component to their play and don’t ‘adjust’ their play accordingly when another is involved,” said study co-author Blythe Corbett, an associate professor of psychiatry at Vanderbilt University in Nashville.

“For example, they tend to interact less with other children and show a preference to play alone or nearby with objects even when other children are near,” she said.

Autism is a developmental disorder in which children have trouble communicating with others and exhibit repetitive or obsessive behaviors. About one in 68 children in the United States has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In the new study, researchers conducted a series of experiments with 42 children, aged 8 to 12, who either had an autism spectrum disorder or were typically developing. The investigators collected samples of cortisol, a stress hormone, from the children’s saliva before and after playing on the playground with another child.

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Author: Kevin Mulligan

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